Love, Worship, and Strangers: Take You on a Cruise

Oh my. Where did February go? Well, I know I promised a reply to friendinmypants this time, but due to extenuating circumstances, I’m going to have to delay that for a bit unfortunately. Instead, let’s look at a favourite seconds moment from idancetothevu: “Take You on a Cruise,” 2:40-3:05.

“Take You on a Cruise” is so enchanting to me—it’s almost embarrassing how much time I’ve spent trying to wrap my theoretical mind around it. For me, the effect of 2:40-3:05 has a lot to do with the fact that it comes in the wake of a very emotional outburst, in which Paul sings up in his high register that he is “a scavenger between the sheets of union.” Underneath this cry, lower-voiced Banks repeats from earlier in the song his words about “the anatomy of kisses” and the question “would you like to be my missus and in future with child?”

Right after this confessional outburst, the music dies down, and Banks repeats himself again, but instead of singing “Baby don’t you try to find me” he sings “Lady don’t you try to find me.” It’s as if Banks and the music pull back from all this emotion, and Banks even goes a step farther by de-personalizing the next lyric from the affectionate “Baby” to the much less personal, almost-as-if-she’s-a-stranger “Lady.”

By the way, I love that another fan referred to this moment as “liquid audio magic.” Beyond the sailing theme present in the lyrics, I feel like TYOAC is one of those Interpol songs that so vividly call to mind a “watery” feeling just in the music alone. This watery effect is especially strong for me at the end of the song, when Banks is singing of black, white and red goddesses, as the two guitar lines swoop over and under each other, creating for me the feeling of waves undulating underneath a boat.

Well, that’s all for now. Perhaps after the “friendinmypants” blog I’ll post my transcription of TYOAC, with a few more thoughts about the music.

Until then,
Con mucho amor,
Meg

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~ by megwilhoite on February 28, 2009.

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